Download Human Capital: How what you know shapes your life (OECD by Brian Keeley PDF

By Brian Keeley

This primary publication within the new OECD Insights sequence examines the expanding financial and social significance of human capital - our schooling, talents, skills, and data. As economies in constructed nations shift clear of production, monetary luck for people and nationwide economies is more and more reliant at the caliber of human capital. elevating human capital has emerged as a key coverage precedence, fairly for low-skilled participants, who're susceptible to being left even extra at the back of. coverage during this quarter is targeting early youth improvement, enhancing caliber and selection in education, growing excellence in tertiary schooling, and widening entry to grownup studying. Drawing at the learn and research of the OECD, this dynamic new e-book makes use of user-friendly language to give an explanation for how international locations around the OECD quarter are responding to the problem of elevating their degrees of human capital. This e-book comprises Statlinks, URLs linking statistical tables and graphs within the textual content of the booklet to Excel spreadsheets displaying the underlying info.

Show description

Read or Download Human Capital: How what you know shapes your life (OECD Insights) PDF

Similar social policy books

Jobs for Youth Des emplois pour les jeunes United Kingdom (Jobs for Youth Desemplois Pour Les Jeunes)

###############################################################################################################################################################################################################################################################

Optimal Economic Growth and Non-Stable Population

This e-book reports optimum fiscal development in a closed financial system which reports non-stable inhabitants development. The economic climate is defined through a neoclassical progress version which distinguishes overlapping generations in the inhabitants. the elemental neoclassical progress version is prolonged to incorporate a number of varieties of technical swap, in addition to funding in human capital or schooling.

Rethinking the Normative Content of Critical Theory: Marx, Habermas and Beyond

Marxism's leader failing is its substitution of a labour conception of worth for the struggles of the labour stream. for this reason, Marxism rests on transhistorical different types which are prone to his personal critique of political financial system. Jurgen Habermas and Axel Honneth search to right this through putting serious conception on a normative starting place.

Corruption and Anti-Corruption in Policing—Philosophical and Ethical Issues

Excessive degrees of police corruption were a power ancient tendency in police providers through the international. whereas the overall quarter of shock during this publication is with police corruption and anti-corruption, the point of interest is on convinced key philosophical and moral matters that come up for police firms confronting corruption.

Extra resources for Human Capital: How what you know shapes your life (OECD Insights)

Sample text

To discuss some of these issues, we spoke to Professor Gary S. Becker, winner of the Nobel prize for economics in 1992 and author of Human Capital, a seminal work published in 1964. Which comes first, economic growth or the expansion of education? It’s not a new question but it’s an interesting question. There are various ways you try to get at that. You look at various increases in education that are based on shifts in public policy, and then you see the subsequent effects on economic growth. I definitely believe there’s a strong causation from improvements in education – in human capital – to economic growth.

There are also big variations within countries on how much is spent on children as they make their way from the sandpits of kindergarten to the lecture theatres of university. On average, countries in the OECD spend $5 055 a year to educate a primary student, $6 939 for a secondary student, and $12 208 for a third-level student, but again these averages mask very big differences between countries. The scale of modern societies’ spending on education inevitably generates heated debates over what the purpose of education should be, how it should be funded, and who it should benefit.

Then there’s causality – does an expansion in education create wealthier societies, or do wealthier societies expand education? And then there are issues like credentialism, which raises the question of whether to some extent employers pay higher salaries to people because they have an academic “credential”, such as a university degree, rather than because they have unique expertise that can improve the company’s productivity. To discuss some of these issues, we spoke to Professor Gary S. Becker, winner of the Nobel prize for economics in 1992 and author of Human Capital, a seminal work published in 1964.

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.32 of 5 – based on 37 votes