Download Higher-Order Finite Element Methods by Pavel Solin, Karel Segeth, Ivo Dolezel PDF

By Pavel Solin, Karel Segeth, Ivo Dolezel

The finite point process has consistently been a mainstay for fixing engineering difficulties numerically. the newest advancements within the box sincerely point out that its destiny lies in higher-order tools, fairly in higher-order hp-adaptive schemes. those ideas reply good to the expanding complexity of engineering simulations and fulfill the general development of simultaneous solution of phenomena with a number of scales.

Higher-Order Finite point Methods presents an thorough survey of intrinsic suggestions and the sensible information had to enforce higher-order finite point schemes. It provides the elemental priniciples of higher-order finite point equipment and the expertise of conforming discretizations in keeping with hierarchic parts in areas H^1, H(curl) and H(div). the ultimate bankruptcy offers an instance of an effective and strong method for computerized goal-oriented hp-adaptivity.

Although it's going to nonetheless take a little time for absolutely automated hp-adaptive finite point the right way to turn into commonplace engineering instruments, their benefits are transparent. In basic prose that avoids mathematical jargon every time attainable, this ebook paves the way in which for totally knowing the opportunity of those options and placing them on the disposal of working towards engineers.

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Higher-Order Finite Element Methods

The finite point approach has constantly been a mainstay for fixing engineering difficulties numerically. the latest advancements within the box basically point out that its destiny lies in higher-order tools, rather in higher-order hp-adaptive schemes. those suggestions reply good to the expanding complexity of engineering simulations and fulfill the general development of simultaneous solution of phenomena with a number of scales.

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3. MEMORY BASICS 21 chip. For this purpose, memory is divided into blocks, say of 64 bytes each. Memory address 1200, for instance, would be in block 18, since 1200/64 is equal to 18 plus a fraction. ) The cache is divided into lines, each the size of a memory block. , the variable in the programmer’s code she wishes to access) already has a copy in its cache—a cache hit. If this is a read access (of x in our little example above), then it’s great—we avoid the slow memory access. On the other hand, in the case of a write access (to y above), if the requested word is currently in the cache, that’s nice too, as it saves us the long trip to memory (if we do not “write through” and update memory right away, as we are assuming here).

As mentioned earlier, it is customary in the R world to refer to each worker in a snow program as a process. A question that then arises is, how many processes should we run? Say for instance we have a cluster of 16 nodes. Should we set up 16 workers for our snow program? The same issues arise with threaded programs, say with Rdsm or OpenMP (Chapters 4 and 5). On a quadcore machine, should we run 4 threads? The answer is not automatically Yes to these questions. With a fine-grained program, using too many processes/threads may actually degrade performance, as the overhead may overwhelm the presumed advantage of throwing more hardware at the problem.

This is due to the fact that processor/memory copies have the least communication overhead. Note carefully that this does not mean there is NO overhead—if a cache coherency transaction occurs, we pay a heavy price. But at least the “base” overhead is small. Still, non-embarrassingly parallel problems are generally tough nuts to crack. A good, commonplace example is linear regression analysis. Here a matrix inversion or equivalent such as QR factorization, is tough to parallelize. We’ll return to this issue frequently in this book.

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